Our Best Business Decision

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Our Best Business Decision

When we were thinking about opening K.Hollis Jewelers over 12 years ago, we were certain that one of our biggest challenges would be hiring and keeping good employees. We had heard all the horror stories about employees so we made a decision that has turned out to be one of the best business decisions we’ve ever made.

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7 Warning Signs Your Jewelry is About to Break

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7 Warning Signs Your Jewelry is About to Break

The greatest fear of the newly engaged is losing that very precious, very expensive diamond ring. Aside from misplacing the entire ring, the center stone is typically the most vulnerable.

Center stones seem to disappear with no notice. But, to the slightly trained eye, there are a few warning signs when your jewelry's about to break...

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Full Circle

The Executive Director - a visionary, in case I didn't mention it - started something he called "The Owners Forum"...

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More on Diamond Certifications

Great example of how different grading labs produce very different grades on the same diamond and how it impacts the price you should pay... and this time a jeweler in Tennessee is being sued over it.

A customer buys a diamond and ring from a jeweler in Tennessee. EGL International diamond grade 2.06 Ct G VS2. The jeweler tells customer throughout the sales process that the EGL grade is just as good as a GIA grade. After the sale, the customer has the diamond graded by GIA. The GIA diamond grade is 2.06 Ct J SI1 - that's 3 color grades and 1 clarity grade lower than the EGL grade. Customer paid almost $18,000 for the diamond and about $21,000 for diamond and setting based on the EGL grade. The jeweler appraised the ring for $27,500 (customer paid just over $21,000). The diamond is valued at about $16,000 using the GIA diamond grade so they paid over $2,000 more than the diamond is actually worth and the jeweler's appraisal is at least $8,000 too high. These are the types of "games" that some jewelers play (this one is being sued over it). Imagine the risk people take by buying a diamond on the internet based on just the diamond certificate! All we can say is make sure you use a jeweler you can trust.

Read the entire article here.

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The "Certified" Diamond Scam

Okay... just saw a TV ad for one of the smaller nationwide jewelry retailers and it makes me want to scream. They are advertising "Certified" diamonds for a "great price". Don't fall for this!

"Certified" means that some diamond lab has graded the diamond. This means they have given their opinion about the color, cut, clarity, and carat weight of the stone. "Certified" does not mean that the diamond is a good diamond - it just means that it has a piece of paper with someone's opinion on it.

There are dozens of diamond labs that certify diamonds and here's what you need to know - some diamond labs are misrepresenting the quality of the diamond. GIA (Gemological Institute of America) is the most reputable grading lab - they set the benchmark for all other labs. EGL USA provides a reputable diamond certification - they tend to be slightly more "forgiving" with their certifications, but generally provide a fair representation of the quality of the diamond. Beware of the diamond grades from any other diamond lab. I cannot tell you that they will be wrong in every case, but some exist so that jewelers can represent the diamond as something other than it really is. This means that the "certification" says one thing, but the diamond is something else... and you paid for what the paper said.

In the case of the "2 Carat Certified Diamond" that gives you "factory direct savings" for under $5,000 that I saw in the TV ad... I did some digging and it is a 2.09 Carat; I2 Clarity; L Color; Very Good Cut. What this means is that it is significantly flawed in terms of inclusions - you will be able to easily see large dark spots and other "marks" inside the diamond with the naked eye. It also means that it is very yellow in terms of color. There is not enough other information provided to determine just how the cut of the diamond detracts from its sparkle and brilliance. They also don't tell you which lab has certified the diamonds so it is highly likely that the diamond is actually worse than described.

I searched 2 reputable online diamond sites and they don't even list or try to sell any diamonds that are this bad so it's impossible for the consumer to understand what they are really buying, how it compares to other diamonds, or the real value of what they are buying.

I actually have no issues with someone purchasing a diamond based purely on size. What I do have a big issue with is how some jewelers represent that diamond to an uneducated buyer.

The point here is that don't be fooled by ads like this. Choose a jeweler that you can trust, will work with you to put together the best ring at a price you can afford and will stand behind everything they sell you. If you really want a 2.09 Carat; I2; L diamond, your jeweler will be able to find one for you at a comparable price to the "factory direct sale price" in the TV ad.

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The 5 Biggest Diamond Buying Mistakes

It's easy - and potentially very expensive - to make mistakes when buying diamonds. Here are some tips on how to avoid the 5 most common diamond buying mistakes.

Diamond Buying Secrets

A few secrets about how retailers work and how to buy the diamond that is right for you